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THE TATTLER 



1949 




THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG, MASSACHUSETTS 



1949 



Jhe Presentation oj a Hook 



All through one's life, the gift of a 
book is in order. Children love to re- 
ceive picture books that are for them 
treasure chests of wonder and delight. 
After they have learned to read, they 
are very anxious to accept as gifts, 
books that portray romance and adven- 
ture. Then, as the years roll on, and 
their tastes and capacities develop — as 
they approach adulthood — they seek 
more and more within the covers of 
books for pleasure, diversion and wis- 
dom; and their pleasure at receiving 
books as gifts is only intensified with 
the passing of years. 

Now and again a person is honored 
in receiving as a gift a book directly 
from the author — with the author's au- 
tograph on the fly leaf. When this hap- 
pens it is a land mark in the book 
lover's life. 

You, dear reader, are accepting here- 
with a book with the best wishes of 
its several authors. We hope you feel 
honored. But there is a further reason 
why your gratification on the re- 
ceipt of this book is expected by us. 
The reason is that we of the Gradu- 
ating Class have not only been its au- 



thors, but we are its principal charac- 
ters. This book contains the romance, 
the drama, the narrative of our lives 
for the last four years. 

During those four years, other char- 
acters have appeared — students who 
attended Williamsburg High School for 
a time and who have left. They played 
their parts well, they have made their 
impression on the story; and we thank 
them for the minor parts they have 
played in making our stay more inter- 
esting and human. 

Right now, though, there are only 
sixteen of us left — sixteen characters 
who were destined from the first to play 
a part in the book right to the last sen- 
tence of the last chapter. 

We have loved appearing as char- 
acters in the book. We have loved 
writing it. Our pleasure is great in pre- 
senting to you this portrayal of four 
years of our lives. Our sincere hope is 
that you, dear reader, will discover it 
to be a breathing, vibrant story of hu- 
man endeavor. 

NANCY J. DUNPHY '49 




Dedicali 



on 



To Mr. Williamson, our teacher and friend, in appreciation of his freely given 
assistance and untiring patience, we gratefully dedicate this issue of the Tattler. 




Edward C. Foster 




Anne T. Dunphy 





Robert M. Branch 




Frances Grinnell 



E. Doris Skrivars 



THE TATTLER 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Editor-in-Chief Nancy Dunphy 

Assistant Editor Reta Ice 

Business Manager Howard Tiley 

Assistants Anne Sabo and Murilyn Graves 

Literary Editor Ann LeDuc 

Assistant Esther Loomis 

Alumni Editor Doris Shumway 

Assistant Irene Ferron 

Sports Editor Robert Durbin 

Assistant Anna Mae Sincage 

Exchange Editor Theresa La Course 

Assistant Ruth Merritt 

Faculty Advisors . . Mr. Williamson and Mrs. Grinnell 



CONTENTS 

Dedication 2 

Faculty Pictures 3 

Senior Class Pictures 6 

Class History 14 

Class Will 15 

Class Prophecy 16 

Prophecy on the Prophet 18 

Class Grinds . 18 

Song and Movie Hits ... 19 

Class Statistics 20 

Seniorscope 21 

Class of '49 22 

Class of '50 23 

Class of '51 24 

Class of '52 ... 25 

Editorials 26 

Literary 27 

Tattler 32 

Burgy Bullet Staff 32 

Forensic League 33 

Glee Clubs 34 

The Clue of the Red Ribbon 35 

Pro Merito 36 

Cheer Leaders 36 

Basketball 37. 38 

Orchestra 38 

Baseball 39 

Informals 40 

Alumni Notes 43 

Autographs 44 

Advertisements 45 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




JEANNETTE ANNE BALDWIN 



"Jay" 



This business-like damsel hails from 
Haydenville. She is very easy-going 
and has never been known to take sides 
in an argument. Her favorite pastime is 
writing letters to the Army Air Force. 
Glee Club 4; Prom Committee 3; Christ- 
mas Ball Committee 3; Basketball 3, 4. 
Class Play Committee 4; Burgy Bullet 4; 
Co-captain basketball Team 3. 

Jolly "Al" Bashful 



NANCY JANE DUNPHY 



"Babe" 



Whenever there is a dance, you are 
bound to find Nancy. Although she is 
noted for her Irish temper, she is always 
willing to work for the class. This Hay- 
denville lass writes letters to her Army 
friends, and is constantly forgetting 
things. 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Review Staff 3 
Burgy Bullet Staff 4; Tattler Staff 3, 4 
Class Historian 4; Christmas Ball 3 
Prom Committee 3; Class Play 4; Music 
Festival 4; Class Play Committee 4; Bas- 
ketball 3, 4; Editor-in-chief Tattler 4; As- 
sistant Editor-in-chief Tattler 3. 




Nice Jovial Daring 



THE TATTLER 



ROBERT ERNEST DURBIN 



"Bob" 



This boy comes all the way from Con- 
way to good old "Burgy High". Al- 
though Bob is easily excited, we all 
know that he is a very good sport. 
Wherever Bob is, there is a crowd of 
girls and many packs of fresh gum. We 
know that his pet peeve is studying in 
Room 2. 

Baseball 2, 3, 4; Tattler Staff 3, 4; Class 
Play Committee 4; Christmas Ball 3; 
Prom Committee 3. 

Robust Excitable Dramatic 




I 





IRENE ELIZABETH FERRON 



"Renie" 



Our Irene is a "Burgy" lass. Outstand- 
ing are her large mischievous blue 
eyes. She will always be remembered 
by her classmates for her giggling and 
arguing in English IV, and also for her 
interest in Snyder's school bus. Our 
vivacious Irene will ne'er be forgotten. 
Glee Club 1, 2; Prom Committee 3; 
Christmas Ball Committee 3; Tattler 4; 
Burgy Bullet 4; Review 3; Class Play 4; 
Class Play Committee 4; Class His- 
torian 1. 



Impish Elusive Free 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




DOROTHY BERTHA GOLASH 



"Dot" 






One can always tell this Haydenville 
lass by her shrill harsh voice. Although 
Dorothy makes her teachers angry at 
times, she will always be remembered 
for her sparkling smile, neat dressing, 
and her ability as an excellent athlete. 
Historian 2; Secretary of Class 3; Prom 
Committee 3; Christmas Ball Commit- 
tee 3; Basketball 3, 4; Captain of Bas- 
ketball 3; Class Play 4; Burgy Bullet 
Staff 4; Glee Club 4. 

Doubtful Boisterous Gay 



THERESA CECILE LaCOURSE "Terry" 

Our petite member of the class is Ther- 
esa. It doesn't take much to make this 
good student from Haydenville blush. 
Theresa likes the Navy very much. Al- 
though she may seem frank at times, 
she will always be remembered as a 
good sport and friend. 
Glee Club 1, 3; Vice-president of class 1, 
3, 4, Treasurer of Class 2; Tattler Staff 
3, 4, Review Staff 1, 2, 3; Burgy Bullet 
Staff 4, Class Play 4; Prom Committee 3; 
Pro Merito 4, Class Play Committee 4, 
Christmas Ball Committee 3. 

Timid Capable Lovable 




THE TATTLER 



ANN ARLENE LeDUC 



"Duchess" 



'Duchess" the president of our class, 
comes from Chesterfield. She is a favor- 
ite with her classmates and also with 
the teachers. This girl will always be re- 
membered for her pleasing personality 
and fine leadership. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Music Festival 4; 
Revue Staff 1, 2, 3; Editor-in-chief of 
Revue 3; Burgy Bullet Staff 4; Tattler 
Staff 3, 4; Alumni Editor of Tattler 3; 
Literary Editor of Tattler 4; Representa- 
tive to Mass. Girls' State 3; D.A.R. Dele- 
gate 4; Pro Merito 4; Prom Committee 
Chairman 3; Class Play 4; Class Presi- 
dent 3, 4; Christmas Ball Chairman 3; 
Class Play Committee 4. 

Amiable Ambitious Loyal 





ESTHER JANE LOOMIS 



"Janie" 



Esther is our trim and neatly dressed 
girl. Although this Haydenville girl is 
very frank, she will always be remem- 
bered for her charming personality. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Secretary 1, 
4; President 2; Tattler Staff 2, 3, 4; Revue 
Staff 2, 3; Burgy Bullet Staff 4; Class 
Play 4; Class Play Committee 4; Basket- 
ball Team 3, 4; Music Festival 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Christmas Ball Commit- 
tee 3. 



V 



Efficient Joyful Lovely 



in 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 








RUTH ELLEN MERRITT 



"Ruth Ellen" 



This quiet and very reserved girl is 
from Lithia. We all know Ruth for be- 
ing so studious and her fondness for the 
Navy. With her gentle way and co-op- 
erative attitude we know that Ruth 
Ellen will be a successful nurse. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Music Festival 4; 
Pro Merito 3, 4; Prom Committee 3; Re- 
vue Staff 1, 3; Burgy Bullet Staff 4; Tat- 
tler Staff 4; Dramatic Club 1; Class Play 
Committee 4; Class Play 4; Christmas 
Ball Committee 3. 

Reliable Earnest Merit 



ALFRED JOHN PAPINEAU 



'Pappy" 



Alfred was a late comer to our class, 
joining us in the latter part of our Jun- 
ior year. He is the "big boy" of our 
class and comes from Goshen. "Pappy" 
is noted for playing baseball and giv- 
ing teachers a hard time. 
Baseball 3, 4. 

"Atlas" Just Polite 




THE TATTLER 



11 



LORRAINE JOAN RICHARDSON "Lull" 

Our jolly young student is Lorraine. 
Although she doesn't have the temper 
that usually goes with red hair and 
freckles, she gets in the teachers' hair. 
This good sport from Goshen keeps the 
classes buzzing with all her jokes. 
Glee Club 4; Prom Committee 3; Christ- 
mas Ball 3; Basketball 3, 4; Class Play 
Committee 4. 

Likable Jolly Rugged 





ARLENE MAE SEARS 



"P'nut" 



This Goshen miss is very congenial and 
will always be remembered for the part 
she played in our class play. This hap- 
py-go-lucky girl is noted for her nice 
personality. 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Christmas Ball Com- 
mittee 3; Class Play 4; Class Play Com- 
mittee 4; Prom Committee 3; Basketball 
3, 4. 



Active Merry Sincere 



12 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




DORIS ANNE SHUMWAY 



"Doodie" 



Another Burgy lass, "Doodie" is a good 
sport and an excellent student. She is 
very frank and has a way of taking 
good care of things that belong to her. 
She is thoughtful, and has a particular 
yen for the Army Air Force. 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sec. of Class 2; 
Music Festival 4; Basketball 3, 4; Cap- 
tain 4; Tattler Staff 4; Alumni Editor 
Burgy Bullet 4; Alumni Editor Revue 
Staff 1; Cheerleader 4; Prom Committee 
3; National Poetry Contest 1; Play Com- 
mittee 4; Christmas Ball Committee 3. 

Delightful Ambitious Sport 



MARY THERESA SROCZEK 



"M. T." 



"M. T." is the genius of the class. She 
is very studious and always willing to 
lend a helping hand to a friend in need. 
Although Mary is sarcastic at times, it 
is only because our pranks seem child- 
ish to a girl with such ability. She is a 
true friend and will go far. 
Forensic League 2; Pro Merito 3, 4; Sec- 
retary of Student Book Guild 3, 4; Class 
Play 4. 




Master Truthful Scholar 



THE TATTLER 



13 



HOWARD HOWES TILEY 



'Bub" 



"Bub" is a native of "Burgy" although 
he spends most of his time in Hayden- 
ville. He is the first member of the class 
to become engaged. His classmates will 
always remember him for being elusive 
with teachers, and talking during class 
meetings. 

Treasurer of Class 3, 4; Basketball 3; 
Captain 3; Baseball 3, 4; Sports Editor 
3; Business Manager for Tattler 4; Prom 
Committee 3; Christmas Ball 3. 

Handsome Haughty Talkative 





FRANK JOSEPH VAILLANCOURT 

"Shmoo" 
"Frankie" is another member of the 
class from "Burgy." He is a lover of the 
ladies and always wears a cheery 
smile. He will always be remembered 
for the fine literature he reads. 
Prom Committee 3; Play Committee 4; 
Christmas Ball Committee 4. 

"Freckles" Jester Vague 



14 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Mi story of the C/ass of 49 



I had been having some very strange 
dreams which caused me to worry. I 
went to a psychiatrist to tell him about 
these nightmares. Suddenly a strange 
feeling came as I relaxed on a couch. I 
must have fallen asleep, for the next 
thing I knew I was one of a group 
walking up a spiral staircase. There 
were four landings and each landing 
was surrounded by six rooms equipped 
with books and desks. On the first land- 
ing we saw a room smaller than the 
others, which was furnished to suit a 
king's taste. The furniture was of the 
best quality and the equipment all 
modern. We were so amazed by these 
surroundings that when a lady ap- 
peared from this room she seemed to 
cast a spell over us. We followed her 
without question while she led us to 
one of the rooms equipped with books 
and desks. There we met the butler, 
Mr. Foster. 

The next day that strange lady came 
back; we learned that her name was 
Miss Dunphy, and that she owned this 
luxurious mansion. She lectured to us 
about the established rules for guests 
and informed us that we were to follow 
them. We became quite panicky now. 
for we had no intention of staying and 
there seemed no possible escape. We 
had been there about a month when 
we were told to meet in the recreational 
hall at 8 o'clock the following evening. 
We became very excited over this 
news because we thought someone 
was going to help us find our way 
home, but no — our hopes were dashed. 
One glimpse of this huge, decorated 
room told us that we weren't going 
home for a long time. You see, they 
were going to punish us for trespassing 
on private property. The most horrible 
events were two feasts, one of which 
consisted of fresh angle worms a la 
king; the other, tomato mud juice a la 
mode. The second terrifying experi- 
ence was a wedding. What would my 
mother think when she found out her 
innocent baby daughter had been led 



blindly into marriage? 

After this trying experience, we de- 
cided that we had better appoint the 
more capable members of our group 
to devise a plan of escape. We chose 
Warren McAvoy as chairman; Theresa 
LaCourse, Esther Loomis, Edward Mc- 
Coigan, and Irene Ferron as assistants. 
We knew it was against the rules for 
guests to throw erasers, chalk, and air- 
planes around the room, but alas, we 
were always in the act when Miss 
Dunphy decided to visit us. 

Suddenly I awoke and was surprised 
to find myself in a doctor's office. I had 
lost all track of time and direction. He 
told me not to worry, that everything 
would be all right, so I went home and 
lay down for a rest; but there was no 
rest for the wicked. My head had no 
sooner hit the pillow than I started 
dreaming again. This time we man- 
aged to get as far as the second floor 
when Miss Dunphy joined us, and, as 
before, she showed us to our room. 
Having lost some of our friends, we de- 
cided to elect a new committee. Esther 
Loomis was chairman, and Allen Syl- 
vester, Doris Shumway, Theresa La- 
Course and Dorothy Golash were chos- 
en as aides. We felt a little more se- 
cure, as we thought we knew what our 
hosts had planned for us, but we did 
not expect the struggle that we did 
have. The new gardener, Mr. Hill, 
stayed with us a year — I guess by this 
time were were really problem chil- 
dren. 

I awoke and being hungry, went out 
to get something to eat. When I re- 
turned, I was very sleepy and jumped 
into bed and before I knew it, I was 
stumbling up the third flight of stairs 
looking for my friends, and found them 
already choosing new members, and 
was greeted by icy stares for being 
late. Ann LeDuc captured the chair- 
man's seat and Theresa LaCourse, Dor- 
othy Golash, Howard Tiley and Ray- 



THE TATTLER 



15 



mond Morin were assistants. We were 
very lonesome on the third floor; there 
simply had to be some way out, and 
we decided to look for it before we 
went any farther. We had to do some- 
thing to raise money so we had a Prom 
and Christmas Ball; we held card par- 
ties, and food sales, but all the time 
"escape" was running through our 
minds. We acted very cheerful and did 
the things asked of us, for we knew we 
would be successful. Mr. Branch, the 
new butler, was very efficient and was 
very helpful to us in our scheme to slip 
away, never to return. 

For a while those awful dreams left 
me, and I enjoyed a few nights of 
peaceful sleep. But I might have 
known they would return. When 1 
managed to drag myself up to the 
fourth floor my comrades were working 
on a plan. We discovered that if we 
had about $500 our plan would work. 
It was finally agreed to present a play 
for we could certainly earn the balance 
we needed. One day when Mrs. Grin- 
nell, the maid, had left the room, Ann 
LeDuc, the new chairman, was making 
arrangements, Theresa LaCourse, Es- 
ther Loomis and Bub Tiley were going 
over the books, while Nancy Dunphy 
was keeping a sharp lookout for tres- 



passers. We decided we would leave 
Monday morning by way of the ventil- 
ator in the laboratory, for home. Some- 
how it didn't work out that way, be- 
cause we landed in New York City at 
the Woodstock Hotel. This didn't stop 
us, though, because we decided to 
make the most of our mistake. We vis- 
ited Radio City, Rockefeller Center, the 
Empire State Building, the Statue of 
Liberty and many other places of in- 
terest. 

Thursday morning we woke up to 
find that our strange lady's spell had 
followed us to New York, and was 
compelling us to return to the mansion. 
Our Mistress came to visit us the first 
morning we were back and told us that 
on June 23rd we would be released 
from the spell. This meant we would be 
free to roam the outer world, making 
the most of our opportunities and also 
giving us hope that our anxiously 
waited-for goal, to be free, would soon 
be ours. 

Strange as it may seem, after I 
stopped eating spaghetti before going 
to bed, those strange dreams never re- 
turned. 

IRENE FERRON '49 



Jiasi vllill and Jesiameni 



We, the class of 1949, of the town of 
Williamsburg, County of Hampshire, 
State of Massachusetts, being of an un- 
sound mind and body, do declare and 
publish that this is our one and only 
Last Will and Testament: 

To the Freshman Class, we bequeath 
our good manners and behavior; we 
believe our little infants can use them. 

To the Sophomore Class, we leave 
our ability to raise money, so that they 
will have a successful class trip. 

To the Junior Class, we provide all 
our vacant seats, and hope they will 
enjoy them as we have. 

To Mr. Merritt, we leave a one year's 
subscription to the Springfield Union — 



he would appreciate GOOD news oc- 
casionally. 

To Miss Dunphy, our guiding princi- 
pal, we leave a bell to warn the stu- 
dents when she is approaching. 

To Mrs. Grinnell, our jolly homeroom 
teacher, we each donate five cents for 
all the times she tried to collect it, when 
we were caught chewing gum. 

To Mr. Foster, we wish to leave a 
nice soft chair, as the table in the lab 
isn't going to hold out forever. 

To Mr. Branch, our hot-tempered 
teacher, we leave a pair of boxing 
gloves. 

To Mr. Williamson, an interesting 



16 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



and helpful teacher, we wish to give 
our thanks and appreciation for all the 
many things he has tried to do for us 
and the school. 

To Miss Skrivars, our fair lady, we 
leave a loud speaker for use in study 
halls, so that she won't lose her voice, 
saying "CAREFUL". 

Dorothy Golash leaves her basket- 
ball ability to Joan Baldwin to see 
whether she can do as much with a 
basketball as Dorothy did. 

Mary Sroczek wills her high honors 
to Burke Ray if he feels that he can use 
them. 

Lorraine Richardson leaves her driv- 
ing ability to Irene Matrishon who 
seems slightly frightened when driving. 

Irene Ferron wishes to give her fits 
of giggling to Audrey Filkins. 

Esther Loomis leaves her way with 
the boys to Shirley Magdalenski, a cute 
junior. 

Ruth Merritt leaves her favorite word 
"Sailor" to Joyce Morin. 

Alfred Papineau leaves his baseball 
ability to Earl Richardson, a great little 
player. 

Robert Durbin leaves a big, white or- 
chid to Gail Papineau. 



Nancy Dunphy leaves all her danc- 
ing partners to Jean Harlow who also 
is a dance fan. 

Ann Le Due, our all-around girl, 
lends her sweet personality to Robert 
Ames if he feels he needs it. 

Doris Shumway leaves her friendli- 
ness to Robert Liimatainen, a bashful 
student. 

Howard Tiley leaves his many ex- 
cuses to Reta Ice, the girl with so many 
answers. 

Theresa La Course leaves her quiet 
ways to Alice Kwiecinski; the girl who 
just loves to talk. 

Frank Vaillancourt wills Charles 
Warner his place in the lab. This is one 
place you are sure to find Frank. 

Arlene Sears leaves her ability as a 
comedienne to Lucy Barnas, a quiet 
little Junior. 

In witness thereof; we do declare 
that this Last Will and Testament, was 
duly signed and sealed by the Class of 
1949, of the Town of Williamsburg, 
State of Massachusetts. 

Witnessed by: 

"49 Mercury" 
"U. S. Marines" 
"Roseland Ballroom" 
— JEANNETTE BALDWIN 



C/3SS Proph 



When, in the hot summer of 1969, I 
decided to go on a cross-country trip, 
I took out my new Mercury and started 
on my way. Arriving in Springfield, I 
decided to do a little shopping in 
Forbes <S Wallace. I was trying on a 
hat when Ann LeDuc came in. She rec- 
ognized me at once, and we had a nice 
little chat. I found out that Ann had 
completed her nurse's training at 
Mercy Hospital in Springfield, and had 
married a young doctor who was now 
the nation's leading brain surgeon. 
She said that she had nothing to do 
now but take care of her four sons. 

After Springfield, my next stop was 



ropnecy 

Hartford. There in a restaurant where 
I stopped to get a bite to eat, I met 
Theresa LaCourse. From her I learned 
that after she had finished her nurse's 
training at St. Francis Hospital in Hart- 
ford, she had married a publisher and 
was now the mother of two boys and a 
girl. I reluctantly left and started for 
the next point in my itinerary — New 
York. 

I arrived in New York City, about 5 
in the afternoon, and stopped at a 
hotel. Just as I was about to enter the 
elevator, I felt a hand touch my arm, I 
turned, and to my surprise, found my- 
self facing Nancy Dunphy. Later, up in 



THE TATTLER 



17 



my room she told me what she had 
been doing. Nancy had given up her 
career as a nurse to marry an up-and- 
coming lawyer, who was now the Unit- 
ed States Senator for the State of New 
York. They were both proud of their 
son, who was a freshman at the Uni- 
versity of Vermont. We talked until 
Nancy suddenly remembered that she 
had an appointment with the govern- 
or's wife. As the hotel seemed unbear- 
ably quiet after Nancy left, I went to a 
night club to find some amusement. 
Robert Durbin danced by with a very 
beautiful woman, whom he later intro- 
duced as his wife. I had heard that 
Bob was a successful florist, and the 
beautiful orchids his wife wore proved 
it. Esther Loomis was there, too, with 
her husband, a very distinguished look- 
ing man, who was the president of a 
great manufacturing concern. She 
started out by being his secretary and 
ended by marrying him. As I was very 
tired, I left early and returned to my 
hotel for a good night's sleep before 
leaving for Washington. 

When I arrived in Washington, I 
looked a positive fright. On an impulse 
I entered a smart looking beauty shop, 
and was astonished to see Arlene 
Sears there. I was even more surprised 
when she told me that she and her hus- 
band owned fifty such shops. What a 
success she was! Arlene told me that 
both Doris Shumway and Ruth Merritt 
came to her shop. She gave me their 
addresses and I went to call on them. 
At Doris' home, a butler answered the 
door and showed me into the library 
where she was entertaining Ruth. We 
had a long talk about old times. Doris 
told me that she was graduated from 
Burbank and that she, too, had married 
a doctor, a heart specialist. Both girls 
had children. Doris had two boys and 
three girls; Ruth, three girls and a boy. 
After we had tea I had to leave, for I 
was planning to reach Cincinnati be- 
fore the week-end. 

About fifty miles from Cincinnati, my 
brakes gave out, but luckily there was 
a repair shop close by. While waiting 
for my car to be fixed, I saw Irene 
Ferron. What a coincidence! She told 



me that she and her husband owned 
the repair shop. "Business is pretty 
good," she said. 

At Cincinnati, seeing that my gas 
tank was getting low, I pulled in at a 
deluxe service station, and tooted the 
horn. Dressed in a neat blue suit was 
a man whom I recognized as Howard 
Tiley. I called to him and he came over 
to the car. He told me that he was mak- 
ing the rounds of his twenty-six service 
stations. He, too, was married, and he 
surprised me with the fact that he had 
seven daughters. He had always liked 
girls, he said, but not that many under 
one roof. 

I hit Chicago next, and remembering 
that a ball game was going to be 
played there, I decided to see it. I 
managed to get a good seat right over 
the Cleveland Indians' dugout. Soon, a 
man came over to me and said, "Re- 
member me? I'm Alfred Papineau." 
Certainly I remembered Alfred! He 
then told me that he was coach, man- 
ager, and part owner of the Indians. 

In St. Louis I ran into, and mean ran 
into, Frank Vaillancourt. My car acci- 
dentally backed into his new Stude- 
baker. While our cars were being re- 
paired, we had a little talk. Frank told 
me that he had married and was now 
the father of five boys. He was working 
with the Philco Company of which he 
was only a vice-president 

I headed for Forth Worth, Texas. Be- 
fore I got there, my car had a flat tire, 
and here I was with no spare. I went 
to a house nearby to call a service sta- 
tion. When I rang the door bell, a wom- 
an answered. Her hair was a trifle 
mussed and her cheek had typewriter 
ribbon smudges on it. "Dorothy," she 
cried, "where did you come from?" I 
took a good look and then recognized 
Mary Sroczek. She invited me in and 
called the service station. While wait- 
ing for the service man, she told me all 
about herself. Mary had achieved her 
ambition of becoming a novelist, and 
had even won the Pulitzer Prize a few 
years ago. But as she used the pen 
name of Mary Therry, few people knew 
who she really was. 



18 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



A few days later in California, my 
car suddenly stalled and wouldn't start 
up again. It was near an Army base, 
but there was a house nearby to which 
I went for help. The colored man who 
answered the door listened to my story 
and led me to the telephone. After I 
finished telephoning, I turned to leave, 
when the door opened, and two wom- 
en in uniform came in. One was a ma- 
jor in the Wacs, the other was a lieuten- 
ant in the Waves. I recognized the 
major as Lorraine Richardson and the 



iieutenant as Jeannette Baldwin. We 
had lunch and reminisced while we 
ate. Lorraine had married an army of- 
ficer who was now a four-star general, 
and Jeannette had married a general 
in the Air Corps. 

As we sat there talking, we thoughi 
of how successful our other classmates 
were. Yes, the class of '49 was a class 
to be proud of. 

DOROTHY GOLASH 



Prophecy on the Prophetess 



It was an unseasonably hot day just 
before Easter in the year 1969, when 
my wife decided to take me window 
shopping. As we walked along upper 
Fifth Avenue, I was suddenly swept off 
my feet and led inside a millinery shop. 

Perspiration started to form on my 
brow as I learned the price of the cre- 
ation my wife had on her head. It was 
merely a cabbage rose with a wisp of 
lavender ribbon. Suddenly a very dis- 
tinguished lady came flying in the 
front door and stood facing me. My 
first glance was at her hat which 
seemed to be a sort of flower pot. But, 
upon closer observation, I noticed two 
very realistic blue-birds which were 
perched in a nest of golden twine. As 
I looked squarely into two big brown 
eyes, I exclaimed, "Dorothy Golash!" 
Soon we were discussing the subject of 
our school days. I learned that Dottie 
was the proprietor of this stylish shop. 



She had started out as a hat model 
and had saved and worked hard until 
she was finally able to swing this shop 
on Fifth Avenue. My wife told me that 
Dottie was one of the smartest milliners 
in New York City. 

Before long Dottie insisted upon our 
going to her apartment for tea. If her 
shop was considered impressive, her 
apartment was even more so. As we 
were sipping tea, I asked if she had 
ever married. She told me that she was 
to be married the following summer to 
a famous New York designer of wom- 
en's clothing. They hoped to open an 
exclusive shop together. 

After a pleasant visit, reminiscing 
and getting caught up with the events 
of the intervening years, we bade 
adieu — that is — until the following 
Easter. 

HOWARD TII.EY 



C/ass C/r/ncfi 



It seems to be my task to try 
To tell about our class, 
So a little note about each one 
To you I'll try to pass. 

I'll start with Doris Shumway 
The girl who likes to roam 
You're bound to meet her anywhere 
They say she's never home. 



Mary Sroczek is the brilliant one 
A hundred in every test 
Always ready to help a friend 
And always does her best. 

From Goshen comes a good sport 
With spirits seldom low 
His pitching helps our ball team 
His name is Papineau. 



THE TATTLER 



19 



"Clothes make the man," says Durbin 
Wearing a neat looking shirt 
That's not his only reason 
Bob's our biggest flirt. 

Mountain Street sends Theresa La- 
Course 
She's friendly, cute, and sweet 
She's learned to mix her work with play 
And besides — She's hard to beat. 

Now Vaillancourt is a quiet lad 
He falls asleep in class 
But even so, he's with us 
We knew he'd surely pass. 

A hard worker comes from Chesterfield 
Who sees our day's well spent 
One guess — and that's enough to tell 
It's Ann, our president. 

When Nancy Dunphy misses her bus 
And sometimes comes in tardy 
Although she's late, we don't mind the 

wait 
For she's the life of the party. 

Irene Ferron seems to like 

To joke and giggle all day 

But that's the type we want with us 

The girl who's always gay. 

Jeannette Baldwin keeps us guessing 
She writes to boys galore 
It's rather hard to figure out 
Who'll be rapping at her door. 



Who is this happy-go-lucky girl 
Who never has worries or fears? 
With all of us she's been a pal 
None other than Arlene Sears. 

For a sporting time we have Lorraine 
Who's as jolly as can be 
And she really knows how to travel 
In her father's new Mercury. 

An ambitious girl is Ruth Merritt 
And a whole lot of fun? Yes indeed! 
And besides all that, she has what it 

takes 
To be one of the girls in the lead. 

"Don't do now what can be put off" 
Is the motto of Howard Tiley 
But, Bub can't be blamed for wanting 
To "lead the life of Riley." 

We have a popular athlete 
Known to us all as "Dot" 
Over girls like Dorothy Golash 
Many a boy has fought. 

To write about myself is hard 
But this I have to say 
To place my signature at the end 
Is by far the easiest way. 

Now that the Class of '49 

is closing its time here 

We leave our thanks to Burgy High 

For years we hold so dear. 

—ESTHER LOOMIS 



Jong ana Jflouie J-lih 

I Love You So Much, It Hurts Me Jeannette Baldwin 

My Girl's an Irish Girl Nancy Dunphy 

Good Sam Bob Durbin 

I Still Get Jealous Irene Ferron 

Take Me Out to the Ball Game Dot Golash 

The Things We Did Last Summer Theresa LaCourse 

Secrets Ann LeDuc and Doris Shumway 

You'll Always Be the One I Love Esther Loomis 

Her Bright Smile Ruth Merritt 

Confess Alfred Papineau 

I'm Happy-Go-Lucky and Free Lorraine Richardson 

Little Iodine Arlene Sears 

I've Never Loved Anyone Mary Sroczek 

I'm in Love Bub Tiley 

Mumbles Frank Vaillancourt 

Worry, Worry, Worry Mr. Merritt 

Thanks for the Memory Miss Dunphy 

Our Buddy Mrs. Grinnell 



20 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



Sweet and Lovely Miss Skrivars 

Jack of All Trades Mr. Foster 

A Wonderful Guy Mr. Williamson 

Killer McCoy Mr. Branch 

Maybe You'll Be There Diplomas 

Again Graduation 

The Best Years of Our Lives Our Four Years at W. H. S. 



Class dfafisiics 



Prettiest Girl Esther Loomis 

Handsomest Boy Howard Tiley 

Most Popular Girl Ann LeDuc 

Most Popular Boy Robert Durbin 

Best Girl Dancer Nancy Dunphy 

Best Boy Dancer Howard Tiley 

Best Dressed Girl Theresa LaCourse 

Best Dressed Boy Robert Durbin 

Quietest Student Ruth Merritt 

Class Vamp Irene Ferron 

Class Sheik Howard Tiley 

Smartest Student Mary Sroczek 

Best Girl Athlete Dorothy Golash 

Best Boy Athlete Alfred Papineau 

Best All-Round Student Ann LeDuc 

Man Hater Mary Sroczek 

Woman Hater Frank Vaillancourt 

Student Most Likely to Succeed Ruth Merritt 

Class Wit .... Lorraine Richardson 

Most Bashful Student Theresa LaCourse 

Jolliest Student Lorraine Richardson 

Most Business-Like Student .... Jeannette Baldwin 

Most Sophisticated Nancy Dunphy 

Class Actress Esther Loomis 

Most Ambitious Doris Shumway 

Best Natured Arlene Sears 



1949 Class *0ri 



On Easter Monday fourteen high 
school seniors took the 6:55 a. m. train 
from Northampton bound for New York 
City. During our four days sojourn our 
two capable and wonderful chaper- 
ones, Mrs. Doris Nuttleman and Mrs. 
Ruth Rudy, took us around New 
York City. The first day we seniors went 
to the Radio City Music Hall ond St. 
Patrick's Cathedral. During our stay 
we toured Rockefeller Center, China- 
town, the Bowery, the Empire State 



rip 

Building, two museums, Central Park, 
and on the last day we ferried to Staten 
Island and back again to Manhattan. 
We saw the stage show, "High Button 
Shoes"; some saw the ice show at the 
Center Theater. Besides doing all this 

and taking subways here and there we 
found time for shopping. Yes, we real- 
ly became familiar with this huge city. 
We returned home fourteen tired but 
happy seniors. 



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:: 



WILLI A" 3 SURG HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1949 
jnphy I H o ward Arm LeDuc 

3D 

2nd row Lorraine I thy Gol; ene 

Sears. 

3rd row: Alfred Papineau. Mary Sroczek, Robert Durbin, Doris Shumv r r.k Vaillancourt 



Presidenl 



Esther Loomis 
Howard Tiley 



Jorfy-nine s Jarewell 



The blue day has dawned wher. sixteen must depart, 

A parting we make with a sorrowful heart, 

missing already, our teachers, our friends, 
eling the emptiness such parting lends. 
Is of our school where we toiled and we learned. 

Where hope and ambition both kindled and burned. 

We're leaving your shelter, to shape life's des: 

We : u farewell 

e proud class of forty -nine. 

NANCY DUNPHY 



THE TATTLER 



23 




CLASS OF 1950 

1st row, left to right: Lucy Barnas, Anne Sabo, Marion Johnson, Robert Liimatainen, Reta 
Ice, Joyce Morin, Shirley Magdelenski. 

2nd row: Anna Mae Sincage, Herbert Nye, Henry Warner, Donald Baldwin, Charles 
Mollison, Elaine Outhuse. 

3rd row: Warren McAvoy, Robert McCord, Allen Warner, Robert Sharp, Charles Warner, 
Philip Morin. 

Absent: Joyce Colson, Earl Richardson. 

President: Reta Ice Secretary: Robert Liimatainen 

Vice-President: Marion Johnson Treasurer: Anne Sabo 

Historian: Joyce Morin 



Junior C/ass P 



oem 



There are speakers among us, 

And artists, too — 

Of cheerleaders and ball-players, 

We have a few — 

We're all of us hard workers, 

Our record is nifty — 

We don't want to brag, 

But we're the Class of 'Fifty. 



24 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




CLASS OF 1951 

1st row, left to right: Frank Barron, Aaron Brown, James Magdelenski, Burke Ray. 

2nd row: Lucia Penfield, Joan Baldwin, Alice Curtis, Barbara Durbin, Arthur Clary, Jean 
Harlow, Dorothy Brewer, Murilyn Graves. 

3rd row: Joan Bachand, Jean Hathaway, Marilyn Black, Molly Pomeroy, Marlene Shay, Ruth 
Bisbee, Irene Matrishon. 

4th row: Shirley Hathaway, Norman Tiley, Jane Smith, John Maggs, Elizabeth Hathaway, 
Gilbert Sears, Alice Barker. 



Absent: Audrey Filkins, Donald Hillenbrand. 

President: Arthur Clary Secretary: 

Vice-President: Barbara Durbin Treasurer: 

Historian: Murilyn Graves 



Jean Harlow 
Dorothy Brewer 



life Ae the 



nes 



Never a pout or a frown will you see 
In these future leaders of democracy 
We're gruff and we're tough 
And though sometimes we're rough 
There's no prouder a bunch than we. 

We were the ones who thought we 
were done 

When this great battle had only be- 
gun. 

But never a class has had more fun 

Than this wonderful class of '51. 

JEAN ELLEN HARLOW '51 



THE TATTLER 



25 




CLASS OF 1952 

1st row, left to right: fames Carson, Charles Anthony, Lewis Draper, Wilbur Loomis, David 
Adam, Robert Ames, Eugene Penfield. 

2nd row: Jeannine Bernier, Alyce Kwiecinski, Sally Adams, John Warner, Edward Merritt, 
Lawrence Snape, Rosalie Bernier, Sylvia Nye, Joyce Baldwin, Patricia Derouin. 

3rd row: Lois Mollison, Joan Damon, Nancy Bickford, Mary Graves, Marjorie Sanderson, 
Eileen O'Brien, Ruth McAvoy, Janet Nichols, Gail Papineau, Barbara Delage. 

4th row: Donald Pringle, Robert Snape, Elson Hathaway, Norman Brisbois, Harry Pomeroy, 
Bruce Purrington, Peter Shumway, Gordon Cranston, Norman LaPointe. 

Absent: Richard Houghton. 



President: Richard Houghton Secretary: 

Vice-President: Lawrence Snape Treasurer: 

Historian: John Warner 



Rosalie Bernier 
Edward Merritt 



Eurau Jresh 



resnmen 



Here we are the freshmen, 

Of little Burgy High, 

Each time we look and think of you, 

We take a breath and sigh!! 



We're glad we came to Burgy High 
But we'll be glad to go, 
As there are many many things, 
We really ought to know. 



BARBARA DELAGE '52 



26 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



(bditarialb 



Jl(ter the £attle the Reward 

Above is our class motto. 

You will no doubt look upon it as 
being rather incongruous, and perhaps 
it will even cause you to smile. We 
of the graduating class, however, will 
not smile. To us, it has been a hard 
fought battle. This has been the first 
real obstacle in our young lives. 

We have been on the offensive. 

It is we who grappled with endeavor 
and hardships, and sixteen of us have 
overcome them. To be considered as 
victors, fills us with an unexplainable 
sense of pride that shall never be for- 
gotten, for that is what we attained 
while we fought together. We look 
back sadly upon our comrades who 
have dropped by the way. We realize 
that all of us could not remain to see 
the victory. 

On this day of June 23, 1949, we are 
sixteen tired, battle-weary seniors. We 
thank God, that for us our first con- 
quest is won. We have earned our six- 
teen credits and now we are entitled 
to our reward. No — I do not mean our 
diplomas. That is but a small part of 
the spoils. Our great reward is that 
now we are prepared to go out into 
the world to conquer real obstacles and 
in defeating them gain the reward 
everyone works for — success — and 
after that, if victory has been obtained 
in decent ways, peace with Almighty 
God. 



■■£ 



egwmng 

In June when the final bell rings, 
each one in the Senior Class should re- 
member that the twenty-third of June, 
nineteen forty-nine does not mark the 
end, but the beginning. 

Four fleeting years have evidenced 
the mark made upon Williamsburg 
High School by the Seniors: sports, pro 
merito, year book, school paper, and 
most of all — school spirit; each has had 
its place. 

As the class ends its days here, each 
member will open a different door. It 
is up to the individual which door he 
will open. No longer may be depend 
on others to help him, for each one 
must choose his own way in life. 

After the Seniors have passed 
through their chosen doors, some may 
enter short and narrow halls; others, 
halls long and wide, for some of the 
halls are success and reward, and 
some are failure. 

As this class takes its place beside 
classes of bygone years, may its mem- 
bers find that success for which they 
seek, and always remember: Don't let 
this be the end, but the beginning. 



NANCY DUNPHY '49 



RETA ICE '50 



THE TATTLER 



27 



±d 



anan 



V 



VoMomSfMuC 



ay Concern 

This is the confession of a murder- 
er. I write it, not because I regret my 
act, but because I wish it to be com- 
prehended by the men who would 
otherwise persecute me for it. 

First of all, I want you to under- 
stand that I am not a potential mur- 
derer — blood and lifeless flesh are 
alien — even nauseating to me. Cer- 
tainly no one who knows mc or has 
known me would classify me as any- 
one but a peace-loving, friendly man. 
Perhaps you will ask yourself how 
such a man could be a cold killer — a 
seemingly repentless murderer? 
Again, perhaps you will ask yourself 
why I did not kill one of my few ene- 
mies instead of a friend I loved — for 
when you read my name signed be- 
low you will realize that I was that 
dead man's only true friend. You will 
agree that it is difficult to take the life 
of one you like so well, but it is even 
worse to live with oneself and one's 
conscience afterwards, and I am a 
weak man. That is why this docu- 
ment is my last — because I am weak, 
and I will not live to face my crum- 
bling conceptions of right and wrong. 

I think he was my friend even be- 
fore I met him. It was many years 
ago; he was climbing the ladder of 
fame then and his picture appeared 
often in newspapers and periodicals; 
I felt an instinctive liking for the clean- 
cut face and the straightforward, hon- 
est eyes. And then I met him, and we 
were inseparable. Our likes and dis- 
likes, our inspirations and beliefs, 
were all fixed in a perfect friendship. 

We helped each other up the lad- 
der of success, then — at first I had 
been a rung higher, then he, then I, 
and my last encouraging campaign 
boosted him to the top and he could 
go no further, nor did he wish to. Suc- 



cess was his, and mine too, for was 
I not his friend, had we not worked 
to where we were, together? 

Yes, victory and success kept us 
going from then on, along with hard 
work, of course. Many had not liked 
my friend before, and, as is so often 
true, his sudden success made their 
dislike grow deeper because they did 
not share it too. But I was still his 
friend. Everything went well for quite 
a long interval, but I am afraid 
things went too well. He began to 
realize his success, too; and he lived 
by it; he breathed it; his every ges- 
ture was that of a man who knew how 
good he was. Then things began to 
go a little less smoothly; instead of 
more friends won, it was more ene- 
mies won. But I was still his friend. 

Up to that time, his thoughts had 
been for the people who had placed 
their trust in him — he had been work- 
ing for those people who had laid di- 
verse fates in his hands. Then, he be- 
gan to change. Along with success 
and power came the shine of chrome, 
the richness of good food, the smooth- 
ness of the finer things of life. What 
mattered that family in Texas if he 
could send his family that new heli- 
copter? What mattered the bill that 
would help so many people if it would 
win him the confidence of the major- 
ity? He was doing good for these peo- 
ple, didn't they realize it? Yes, how 
could they when they were being 
overshadowed by a cloud that al- 
lowed no glimpse of the good to shine. 

I knew he must be stopped before 
it was too late, but how could he be 
stopped? He didn't or wouldn't real- 
ize his faults; the average person 
could not even penetrate his studied 
business-like briskness with words. 
But wait; I was his friend; he would 
listen to me. I would talk to him; he 
would understand; he would retrace 



28 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



the road back to his old self and all 
would be well. I would talk to him, 
and the unselfish man whom I had 
loved and who had captured the 
trust of so many people would be 
alive again. 

And so, I talked to him — I talked 
and the words seemed silly and in- 
appropriate in the same room with 
his engaging personality. It was not 
long before even I began to think all 
those things had been my imagina- 
tion — that after all he was not at fault. 

That is what drove me to murder. I 
could see his success crumbling the 
lives of so many people — I could see 
what he was doing, yet nothing I could 
say could stop him. I could not endure 
his subdued feasting on the prey as it 
were, and I shot him. Even though I 
was his friend and he trusted me, I 
killed him. 

This is my confession. I am writing 
it so that you whom it may concern will 
understand, and so that no other inno- 
cent man may be blamed or hanged 
for a deed that now rests heavily on my 
shoulders. I write it so that you will 
know that I cannot live with my con- 
science after performing a duty that is 
God's alone. I write it to tell you that 
he was basically a good man, and that 
even good men sometimes begin to rot 
from within. Let him be known as a 
victor — let me be known as the friend 
because I took his life. 

I am going to shoot myself now. 
What else is there to do — ? I have, less 
than twenty-four hours ago, assassinat- 
ed the President. 

ANNE SABO '50 



"jSotfs IStiW £e Soys' 

Judy had just started to read the Life 
of Van Johnson, when the telephone 
rang. She jumped up to answer it, hop- 
ing it would be her best friend, Lois. To 
her disappointment, it wasn't. It was 



Mrs. Johnson who lived a few houses 
away. She asked, 

"Judy, would you like to come over 
and baby sit with my dear little boy, 
William?" 

"I wouldn't mind, in fact, I would 
love to." 

After the supper dishes were done, 
Judy took her book and walked slowly 
over to Mrs. Johnson's. From what she 
had heard from Lois, William wasn't 
such a dear little boy. She finally 
reached the Johnson house, went up to 
the door, and rang the bell. 

Mr. Johnson answered the door. 
"Hello, come right in and make your- 
self at home." Judy went into the liv- 
ing-room and sat down. 

Very soon Mrs. Johnson came down 
the stairs. "I'm sure William will be all 
right. There are some cookies and 
milk in the kitchen. I'm sure every- 
thing will be fine. We'll probably be 
home about 10:30. In case you need 
us we'll be at Jones'." 

Judy said good-night and went back 
to the Life of Van Johnson. Just as she 
came to the middle of the story, she 
heard yelling from William's room. She 
ran up-stairs and into his room. There 
was dear little William hanging out of 
the window yelling, "Look at me! I'm 
Tarzan. Look at me!" 

Judy grabbed him and pulled him in. 
"You were a naughty boy to do that. 
You could have been killed," she 
scolded. 

"Oh, go fly a kite." 

"Now get into bed and go to sleep," 
commanded Judy. 

"But I want you to read to me!" 

"Oh all right, but you must promise 
to go straight to bed after I've finished." 
He promised and Judy was soon read- 
ing The Three Bears. Suddenly the 



THE TATTLER 



29 



telephone jangled. 

"There is a telephone in my mother's 
room which is just down the hall." Judy 
hurried to his mother's room. She tried 
in vain to find the light switch, and 
after stumbling over a half dozen 
things she finally found it; no telephone 
in that room. She started for the stairs. 
Zing! She was at the bottom. One of 
dear little William's marbles rolled 
into a corner. She picked herself up 
and limped over to the phone. "Hello." 

"Hello, is this Mabel? Well this is 
Eva, and have you heard about — " 

"I'm sorry," interrupted Judy, "but 
this is not Mabel." 

"Oh, I'm terribly sorry," said the 
voice on the other end of the line. Judy 
hung up and slowly climbed the stairs. 
She went into William's room but he 
was nowhere to be seen. "William, 
William." No answer. She looked 
everywhere, but no William. She 
called again, but no answer. She was 
going to call Mrs. Johnson v/hen she 
heard someone walking around in the 
bathroom. She opened the door. There 
was William putting on his mother's 
make-up. The bathroom was in a 
shambles. There was powder all over 
the floor, lipstick on the sink and bath- 
tub, and the room smelled to high heav- 
en with perfume. "Oh dear," cried 
Judy. 

"Don't I look pretty, Judy, don't I?" 

"Oh yes, very pretty." Judy finally 
got William washed and put to bed 
and he was soon sound asleep. Judy 
had just scrubbed the last mark off 
the bathtub when Mr. and Mrs. John- 
son came home. My, wasn't Judy glad 
to see them. 

"Everything okay?" 

Then Judy told them what had hap- 
pened. Mrs. Johnson couldn't believe 
her ears, but Mr. Johnson only laughed, 
"Boys will be boys." 

"Oh yes, thought Judy, boys certain- 
ly will be boys." 

JOAN DAMON '52 



J he Ji 



xer 

She heard the bell tinkle as the 
door of the dingy apartment house 
opened. The door was two flights 
down, but the building was so dingy 
and hollow, the bell echoed through 
the entire hotel. She clutched the 
edge of the bed; her knuckles showed 
white. It couldn't be Jack. He could 
never find her here. She heard the 
footsteps on the first flight of stairs. 
She shrank on the bed and listened. 
That was his walk!! No!! How could 
it be? She had been so careful. He 
had sworn he would kill her if he 
found her, but he didn't know where 
she was, did he? In desperation she 
pulled the gun from the top drawer 
of the old bureau. Wait!! He was 
walking down the hall on the floor 
below. Yes! She could hear him. It 
must be one of the men who lived 
on that floor. She heaved a sigh and 
put the gun away. How silly she was! 
How could he find her? She had only 
been out of the apartment once, and 
that was to get groceries. The only 
telephone calls she had made were 
to Mable and to the plumber, to fix 
that old pipe. How could he — wait!! 
maybe Mable? — but no, Mable didn't 
even know him. She went over and 
picked up the coffee pot. A moment 
later it clattered to the floor. She 
swung around. Footsteps again!! The 
same footsteps she had heard before, 
and they were coming up the second 
flight of stairs. They were his!! She 
blanched with terror. He was walking 
toward her room! Perspiration glis- 
tened on her forehead, she shook all 
over. She yanked the gun from the 
drawer. The footfalls had stopped. 
The stranger raised his fist to knock; 
a shot rang out. 

People who rushed in from neigh- 
boring apartments found her lying 
dead on the floor, a bullet through 
her head. In questioning the stranger, 
the police asked, "So, you say you 
came to fix her?" 

"No sir, you're kinda mixed up. I 
came to fix the pipe. You see — I'm 



30 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 



the plumber." 



NANCY DUNPHY '49 



It was about eleven at night, and I 
had come home from the movies. Dur- 
ing the day the police had put out an 
alarm for a dangerous killer. They 
gave a full description of the maniac, 
and told everyone to be on the look- 
out for him. I had just settled down in 
my easy chair with a book and turned 
the radio on. A few minutes later a 
knock was heard on the door. I opened 
it. Who should be there, but my moth- 
er. She forgot her key. 

LORRAINE RICHARDSON '49 



As I walked by the dark warehouse 
on the waterfront, all sorts of ideas 
went through my mind because of the 
darkness and shadows. In the distance 
I heard the clicking of heels on cement. 
The street lights were on, but the night 
was very foggy and one couldn't see 
ten feet in front of him. The clicking of 
the heels stopped now and then; and 
when they started again, they seemed 
to increase in volume. After a few min- 
utes of taking a step and then stopping, 
a shape took form, coming out of the 
fog. I stood as if frozen to the spot 
as it came closer and closer. I then 
noticed something in the shape's hand. 
Hanging down by its side was a long 
cylindrical object. Out of the fog 
walked Mr. Clancey, the local cop on 
the waterfront beat. Down by his side 
he swung his night stick. 

ALFRED PAPINEAU '49 



Ray Black was sitting home one 
night listening to the radio with his 
wife when suddenly the phone rang. 
It was his boss who wanted him to 
come to the office and work overtime. 
Mrs. Black was left alone. The night 
was fierce. The rain was beating 
down on the old house, and the thun- 
der would shake it from top to bot- 
tom. Suddenly, the lights went out, 
and Mrs. Black was left sitting in the 



dark. Her tiny little fingers began to 
tremble just a little by now, when sud- 
denly there was a bang, bang, bang 
coming from the top of the stairs. She 
frantically rushed to the cupboard 
looking for a candle, when she dis- 
tinctly heard footsteps coming down 
the back stairs. Each step sounded 
louder and louder, until suddenly with 
a flash of lightning and a roar of 
thunder the kitchen door burst open, 
and a voice shrieked, "Mommy, Mom- 
my, the window came loose and it's 
raining all over my bed!" 

HOWARD TILEY '49 



lUiih a %sh 

by 

IEAN ELLEN HARLOW '51 

To the Teachers of Burgy High 

Sometimes the cross gets heavy 
Especially when you're weary; 
We may stumble and fall 
But there's no need for call 
We'll make it — with a push. 

Oh, if no one were there 

In this time of despair, 

What would happen when we got 

down? 
It's blessed we are 
That they're not far 
For I think they would not let us 

drown. 
They just look at us while 
They speak out with a smile; 
We'll make it — with a push. 

If we shove all together 

It is light as a feather 

This terrible cross we must bear 

If we try with some care 

We're apt to get there 

And we'll make it without any push. 

JEAN ELLEN HARLOW '51 



It was close to midnight and the 
wind rustled the leaves on the trees. 
The trees themselves cast a shadow 
over the lawn and house. As I made 
my way toward the door, I became 
terrified, for I could see a figure 



THE TATTLER 



31 



emerging from the shadows by the 
side of the house. What could I do? If 
I screamed, no one would hear me; 
if I ran I might fall and be caught by 
the pursuer. I had no right here and 
would not be here if it were not im- 
perative that the mystery about the 
house be made known. The figure 
was coming closer and I looked 
around for a place to hide, but it was 
too late — I fainted. 

IRENE FERRON '49 



Jl %onJer Ttthy 

I wonder why the clear blue sky, 
Always seems so very high, 
And why the stars that shine at night, 
Are always there so big and bright. 

I wonder why the grass is green, 
And why the air is never seen, 
Why trees in winter are so bare, 
What makes the sun shine way up 
there. 

I wonder what makes the frogs all 

peep, 
What makes the oceans blue and 

deep, 
Why flowers bloom upon the hill, 
What gives the winter air its chill. 

I wonder what makes time fly, 
And why the clouds go sailing by, 
What makes the night so very dark, 
What makes the pretty meadow lark. 
I wonder why things have to be, 
And why they seem so strange to me, 
But I guess these things that seem so 

odd, 
All come from the Almighty God. 

NANCY BICKFORD '52 



Jl lii all in the llbooAs 

A beautiful, sunny spring day, 

A little girl strolling through the 

woods, 
Glancing at the ground, she sees a 

Pink Lady Slipper. 
Walking a little farther, she exclaims, 
"Look! a Swamp Pink Bush!" 
As she strolls along she notices the 



trees, 

The green leaves just coming out, 

The robin chirping a happy little song. 

Pausing a moment, she thinks of to- 
morrow — Easter. 

When I go to church I shall pray that 
this may always be a Peaceful 
world. 

This walk has made me see how 
grateful I am for the wonderful 
world God created for us. 

At present we are at peace. 

How grateful I am for peace. 

My brother was killed in the war. 

RUTH MERRITT '49 



Jhe Koaa Jineai 

Forward we go on the road of life, 
Facing new struggles and harder 

strife, 
Hoping to win over all in the end, 
Making a circle of smiling friends. 

We may not all success attain, 

The road is rocky on the way to fame; 

Sneers and jeers may be cast our 

way, 
As we trod wearily along at the end 

of day. 

ANN A. LEDUC '49 



M 



ome 



Where is the place where one's heart 

is? 
Where does one rest in peace? 
Where does one rest after long days? 
Where does the world's rush cease? 

There is the end of my journey 
There's where I long to be 
Not in the grip of life's madness, 
Nor tossed on the world's busy sea. 

Home ... is the place that I love so. 
Home ... is the place that loves me. 
Out of the rush of the world's cares 
Home, happy home is for me. 



JANE SMITH '51 



32 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




TATTLER STAFF 

1st row, left to right: Faculty advisor — Mrs. Grinnell, Reta Ice, Nancy Dunphy, Ann LeDuc, 

Faculty advisor — Mr. Raymond Williamson, Theresa LaCourse. 
2nd row: Anna Mae Sincage, Esther Loomis, Doris Shumway, Howard Tiley, Robert Durbin, 

Ann Sabo, Murilyn Graves, Ruth Merritt. 




"BURGY BULLET STAFF" 
1st row, left to right: Alyce Kwiecinski, Joyce Baldwin, Anne Sabo, Allen Warner, Reta Ice, 

Joyce Morin and Theresa LaCourse. 
2nd row, left to right: Elaine Outhuse, Jean Harlow, Dorothy Golash, Jeannette Baldwin, 

Irene Ferron, Esther Loomis and Dorothy Brewer. 
3rd row, left to right: Nancy Dunphy, Ruth Merritt, Jane Smith, Philip Morin, Doris Shumway, 

Ann LeDuc and Shirley Magdalenski. 
Absent when picture was taken: Joan Damon. 



THE TATTLER 



33 




FORENSIC 

1st row, left to right: Anne Sabo, Jane Smith, Murilyn Graves and Sally Adams. 
2nd row, left to right: Dorothy Brewer, Arthur Clary, Burke Ray and Reta Ice. 



Jorensics 



The season started on November 10 
when the annual practice debate tour- 
nament was held in Northampton. Five 
teams traveled there with Coach Ray- 
mond Williamson. The program in- 
cluded a speech and two practice de- 
bates lor each team. 

The league debates started with 
Williamsburg against Westfield, and at 
the close of these contests, four wins 
out of ten were credited to Williams- 
burg High School by the varsity teams, 
and one win out of ten was the stand- 
ing of the Junior Varsity. 

On March 26 four members of the 
Forensic League traveled to Hadley for 



the Model Congress which is held an- 
nually. The day proved interesting and 
our students showed themselves well 
prepared for the bills which were pre- 
sented. 

At the close of the year, declama- 
tions were given by the students in the 
fields in which they did superior work. 
V/e wish to congratulate Sally Adams, 
Dorothy Brewer, Reta Ice, and Jane 
Smith who have become members of 
the National Forensic League and Ar- 
thur Clary, Murilyn Graves, Reta Ice, 
and Anne Sabo who obtained higher 
degrees. Our coach, Mr. Williamson, 
also received membership in the or- 
ganization this year. 



34 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




GIRL'S GLEE CLUB 

1st row, left to right: Sylvia Nye, Arlene Sears, Alyce Kwiecinski, Anna Mae Sincage, Ruth 
Bisbee, Marion Johnson, Doris Shumway, Alice Curtis, Joyce Morin. 

2nd row: Elaine Outhuse, Lorraine Richardson, Jeannette Baldwin, Ruth Merritt, Reta Ice, 
Esther Loomis, Nancy Dunphy, Dorothy Golash, Jean Harlow. 

3rd row: Ruth McAvoy, Marjorie Sanderson, Alice Barker, Molly Pomeroy, Jane Smith, Ann 
Sabo, Murilyn Graves, Ann LeDuc, Shirley Magdalenski, Nancy Bickford. 

Absent: Joyce Colson, Audrey Filkins. 




BOYS' GLEE CLUB 

1st row, left to right: Robert Liimatainen, John Warner, Elson Hathaway, Edward Merritt, 

Herbert Nye. 
2nd row: Robert Ames, Bruce Purrington, Harry Pomeroy, Lawrence Snape, Burke Ray. 
3rd row: Gilbert Sears, Allen Warner, John Maggs, Warren McAvoy. 
Absent: Richard Houghton. 



THE TATTLER 



35 




Jhe C/ue o| me Red Ribbon 



The Senior Class play was the hit of the year and the girls did a fine job. 
The only disappointment came to some of the girls in the audience. The lack 
of a single hero in it! But by the time the last curtain had been rung down and 
the applause was sounding noisily around the room, it had been proved that 
an all-girl cast can produce a successful play. Everyone was completely 
happy. 

The play showed that everyone had had careful training both in cues and 
directions. Mr. Parent was a real director. He had the girls living their parts. 

Esther Loomis along with her companions portrayed young city girls who 
had come to the mountains for a vacation. Her companions included Theresa 
LaCourse, Ruth Merritt, Irene Ferron, Ann LeDuc and Dorothy Golash. 

Mary Sroczek was actually in her part from beginning to end. She played 
the part of a school teacher, acting as chaperone who had lost her engage- 
ment ring. 

The ring actually had been taken by one of the girls, who hoped to make 
Arlene Sears and Nancy Dunphy leave the group. You might have thought 
these two girls had lived in the country all their lives, they played their parts 
so flawlessly. 

The curtain came down on a happy ending the night of March 25 after 
it had been put before the public for the fifth time. 



36 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




PRO MERITO 

1st row, left to right: Ruth Merritt, Anne Sabo, lane Smith, Ann LeDuc and Theresa 

LaCourse. 
2nd row, left to right: Elaine Outhuse, Mary Sroczek, Murilyn Graves, Marlene Shay and 

Marion Johnson. 
3rd row, left to right: Doris Shumway, Allen Warner, Gilbert Sears and Betty Hathaway. 
Absent when picture was taken: Audrey Filkins. 




ORCHESTRA 
Seated, left to right: Jane Smith. Sylvia Nye, Sondra Black and Joan Culver. 
Standing, left to right: David Heath, Murilyn Graves, Elson Hathaway and Ruth McAvoy. 



THE TATTLER 



37 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL 

1st row, left to right: loan Bachand, Jeannette Baldwin, Dorothy Golash, Capt. Doris 
Shumway, Reta Ice, Marilyn Black and Lorraine Richardson. 

2nd row, left to right: Alyce Kwiecinski, Joan Baldwin, Joan Damon, Mary Graves, Eileen 
O'Brien, Arlene Sears, Lucia Penfield and Joyce Baldwin. 



C//ns Sports 



This year the Williamsburg High School girls were very fortunate in 
being directed in athletics by Miss Doris Skrivars, a fine leader. This year 
there were many new players from the freshman class, and although it was 
an unsuccessful year, the girls tried hard and displayed good sportsmanship. 
Four very good players: namely, Doris Shumway, Dorothy Golash, Jeannette 
Baldwin, and Lorraine Richardson will be lost to our squad next year by 
graduation. 



38 



WILLIAMSBURG HIGH SCHOOL 




BOYS' BASKETBALL 

1st row, left to right: Eugene Penfield, Elson Hathaway, Capt. John Maggs, Herbert Nye and 

Peter Shumway. 
2nd row, left to right: James Magdalenski, Harry Pomeroy, Robert McCord, Gilbert Sears, 

Donald Baldwin and Philip Morin. 
Absent when pictures were taken: Richard Houghton and Earl Richardson. 




CHEERLEADERS 

1st row, left to right: Doris Shumway, Jean Harlow, Joyce Morin and Capt. Reta Ice 
2nd row, left to right: Anna Mae Sincage, Dorothy Brewer, Sylvia Nye and Alyce 
Kwiecinski. 



THE TATTLER 



39 




BOYS' BASEBALL 

1st row, left to right: Charles Anthony and Wilbur Loomis. 

2nd row, left to right: Jimmy Magdalenski, Herbert Nye, Charles Mollison, Henry Warner, 
Gordon Cranston, Donald Pringle and Philip Morin. 

3rd row, left to right: Elson Hathaway, Alfred Papineau, Donald Baldwin, Robert McCord, 
Peter Shumway, Eugene Penfield and Robert Liimatainen. 

4th row, left to right: Gilbert Sears, John Maggs, Allen Warner, Robert Durbin, Howard 
Tiley and Charles Warner. 

Absent when picture was taken: Earl Richardson. 



Up to date the Williamsburg High 
baseball team has played five games. 

During a game with Huntington High 
Alfred Papineau, the star pitcher of 
the Burgy team, was injured when he 
slid into third base. Because of the ac- 
cident, Alfred will be unable to play 
for the rest of the year. 

The boys have the "New Look" this 
year with the new uniforms which they 
have bought. 

The scores for this year so far are as 
follows: 

Williamsburg 3 Huntington 7 

Williamsburg 4 .... Sanderson Acad. 21 

Williamsburg 5 Clarke School 7 

Williamsburg 9 Huntington 3 

Williamsburg 4 Clarke School 7 

ROBERT DURBIN '49 








4 



M 




INFORMALS 

1. Seniors in New York. 2. Seniors in New York, 3. Chaperones Mrs. Nuttleman and Esther 
Johnson, 4. Seniors in New York, 5. Seniors in New York, 6. Ruth Merritt, 7. Ann LeDuc. 
8. Irene Ferron, 9. Seniors in New York, 10. Irene Ferron. 




.-* • 




INFORMALS 

1. Nancy Dunphy, 2. Doris Shumway, 3. Ann LeDuc, 4. Arlene Sears, 5. Dorothy Golash, 
6. Lorraine Richardson, 7. leannette Baldwin, 8. Howard Tiley. 




DAYS OF OUR YOUTHS 

1. Mary Sroczek, 2. Lorraine Richardson, 3. Doris Shumway, 4. Nancy Dunphy, 5. Arlene 
Sears, 6. Robert Durbin, 7. Ann LeDuc, 8. Irene Ferron, 9. Esther Loomis, 10. Theresa 
LaCourse, 11. Ruth Merritt. 



THE TATTLER 



43 



at 



umni 



%at 



C4 



Jilumni 

CLASS OF 1948 

Robert Collins — Student at Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 

Palma Ingellis — at home. 

Barbara Outhuse — Student at Sar- 
gent's School in Boston. 

Shirley Nichols — Student at Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. 

Shirley Shumway — Student at Bur- 
bank Hospital School of Nursing in 
Fitchburg. 

Marilyn Williams — Student at Com- 
mercial College in Northampton. 

Ruth Wells— At home. 

Laura Lloyd — At home. 

Russell Warner — In the U. S. Army. 

Viola Fraser — Student at American 
International College in Springfield. 

Mae Sanderson — Employed in the 
office of Williamsburg High School. 

June Demerski — Employed in the 
office of the Haydenville Co. 

OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI 

President Clarence Larkin 

Vice-President . . Margaret Trainor 

Secretary Joseph Soltys 

Treasurer Doris Sincage 

Executive Committee: Elizabeth Burke, 

Robert Nash, George Munson, Mrs. 

Dorothy Colburn, Thomas Barrus 



MARRIAGES DURING 


'48- 


'49 




Name Year Graduated 


Frank Wells Munson 






1943 


Ernestine Eleanor Warren 








Robert Nash 






1925 


Ruth Grace Erickson 








Albert Edward Warner 








Geneva Graves 






1943 


Paul Brown 








Norma Emma Nietsche 






1939 


Ronald Melvin Emrick 






1927 


Ruth May Beebe 






1942 


Stanley Guzik 








Ruth LaCasse 






1945 


Francis Patrick Molloy 






1940 


Marie Adeline Rousseau 









Bernard Joseph Miller 
Rita Jeanette Lupien 
James Hester 
Beverly Cole 
Charles Stout 
Shirley Knight 
Arthur Fuller 
Hattie Clark 
Robert Andrews 
Fern Mosher 
Gordon Himmelman 
Lorraine Jones 

DEATHS 
William A. Ryan 



1945 
1945 
1943 
1946 
1937 
1945 

1918 



A 



umm 



BIRTHS 



Name 



Year Graduated 



Daughter to Hans Nietsche 1935 

Son to Bob Otis 1937 

Son to Ruth Evans Lawton 1939 

Daughter to Mary Noyes Waddell 1943 
Son to Norman Graves 1934 

Daughter to Don Otis 1939 

Daughter to Anna Baj Meehan 1934 
Daughter to Bob Merritt 1930 

Son to Hazel Packard Taylor 1939 

Daughter to Marion Culver Atkins 1943 
Son to Betty Lou Harlow Sylvester 1943 
Daughter to Charles A. Bisbee Jr. 1935 
Son to Arlene Sabo Harry 1943 

Son to Charlotte Brooks Ray 1944 

Son to Esther Mollison Korowski 1941 
Daughter to Florence Packard Eldred 

1940 
Daughter to George Judd 1933 

Daughter to Winthrop A. Stone 1940 
Son to June Bowker Newell 1941 

Robert Newell 1941 

Son to Thomas W. Barrus 1930 

Son to Shirley Rhodes Miesse 1940 

Daughter to George Waller 1929 

Daughter to Richard Culver 1941 

Daughter to Albert Mosher Jr. 1935 
Son to Martha Deane Townsely 1943 
Daughter to Norma Nietsche Brown 

1939 
Son to Hans Nietsche 1935 

Son to Raymond Johndrow 1940 

Son to Audrey Jones Marvell 1942 



cAutographs 



SIGNPOST OF YOUR FUTURE 



*l 



►a >v 






i 



!'-,. ,ai 



AMERICAN 
INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE 




TT 



GOING TO COLLEGE? 

The country and the community need college trained men and women 

to lead the coming generations. 

at AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE 



you are offered 



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A good chance for a scholarship. Some high ranking students will be 
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Compliments of 

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Williamsburg 



Compliments of 



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and it's all done with 



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There's magic in lights . . . add a light here, place a spotlight 
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Your Vantine photographer knows how lighting effects can be 
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tant senior year. . . . The victories of the athletic teams. . . . The 
brilliance of social occasions. . . . The Prom. . . . The plays. . . . 
The debates. . . . The expression of everyday life on the campus. 

That personalized portraits by Vantine are important is attested 
to by the fact that over 300 schools and colleges repeatedly entrust 
their photographic work to Vantine. 



WARREN KAY VANTINE STUDIO 

132 Boylston Street 
Boston, Mass. 




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Compliments of 



COLLINS PLUMBING 




SUPPLY CO. 



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HOLYOKE 



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PLEASANT TIME SHOP 

WATCHES RINGS DIAMONDS 

EXPERT WATCH REPAIRING 
83 Pleasant Street 




Northampton 



B 



HARLOW'S 

LUGGAGE REPAIRS 

Bill Folds — Toilet Kits 

Expert Locksmith 

18 Center St., Northampton Tel. 115-W 



Congratulations and continual success in 
the future. This is the wish of the leading 
men's and boys' wearing apparel store in 
Northampton. 

HARRY DANIELS 
ASSOCIATES 




WARD MILLER 

Westinghouse and Norge Refrigerators 

York Boiler Burner Units 

Oil Burners <S Service 

HOME INSULATION 

14 Center St., Northampton Tel. 2123-R 



Compliments of 



KING'S 
PAINT & PAPER STORE 



157 Main Street 



Northampton 



RUBY'S 
FURNITURE STORES, Inc. 

15 Bridge Street, Northampton 



Tel. 3519 



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WM. BAKER & SON 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Service — Courtesy — Satisfaction 

Tel. 2341 Chesterfield 



Compliments of 



WILLIAMSBURG GENERAL 



STORE 



BERKSHIRE ETCHING 
CORPORATION 

MANUFACTURERS OF NAMEPLATES 



Compliments of 

THE RAINBOW CLUB, Inc. 

HAYDENVILLE, MASS 



Compliments of 



MORRIS CLARK 



Compliments of 

THE CLARY FARM 

Try Our Maple Syrup 

For Farm and Village Property Consult 

SILAS SNOW 



Tel. 3563 



Williamsburg 



Compliments of 



O'BRIEN'S PAINT SHOP 



HAYDENVILLE 



PADDOCK'S 

CLEANERS AND TAILORS 
Suits Made to Order 

$47.50 and Up 
FLORENCE, MASS. 






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RAY'S LUNCH 

ESSO GAS AND Oil. 
Williamsburg on Route 9 



DR. CHARLES C. STARK, JR. 

OPTOMETRIST 
TEL. 766-W 

Mon. Evenings by Appointment 

Hours: 9 to 1 — 2 to 5:30 

110 Main Street Northampton, Mass. 



Compliments of 



F. OLIVER 



MANHAN 
POTATO CHIP CO., Inc. 

NORMA LEE CANDIES 
92 King St. Tel. 771 Northampton 



Compliments of 



L. JENKINS 



BISBEE BROTHERS 

Get Our Prices on Everything You Need 
Tel. Williamsburg 271 and Chesterfield 2145 



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Compliments o/ 



NORTHAMPTON STREET 





RAILWAY COMPANY 



EDWARD A. PELLISSIER 



Vice Pres. and Gen. Mgr 





SERVING WILLIAMSBURG 



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Compliments o/ 

ROBERT NEWELL CLASS OF '41 

SOCONY STATION 
Across From Dickinson Hospital 



Compliments of 



PACKARD'S SODA SHOPPE 



Compliments of 

HASKELL & GILBERT OFFICE SUPPLY, Inc. 

SCHOOL AND OFFICE SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 
247 Main Street, Northampton 



Tel. 672 



Compliments of 

DR. M. M. DUNPHY 



Compliments of 


WOOD & STRAND 


MACDONALD'S SHOE SHOP 


Jewelers Northampton 
WATCHES 




ELGIN HAMILTON 


185 Main Street Northampton 


BULOVA MOVADO 




LONGINES OMEGA 



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17 South Street 



Compliments ot 

NASH'S 



Williamsburg, Mass. 



Compliments of 



EGESTA FARMS 



Compliments of 



F. N. GRAVES & SON 



WILLIAMSBURG 



All Kinds of Rough and Finished Lumber 
Lathe Dowels Bandsawing 

PACKARD BROS. 

GOSHEN 
Tel. Williamsburg 4073 



Congratulations to the Graduates 



FINES ARMY NAVY STORE 




37 Main St. 



Northampton 



Compliments o/ 



GUSETTI'S 



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HAYDENVILLE BUTTON COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

Manufacturers of 

PEARL BUTTONS AND NOVELTIES 

Haydenville, Mass. 



HICKEY'S ICE CREAM BAR 

Bridge St. Haydenville 

Cigarettes — Magazines 

Cigars — Newspapers 

La Salle's Ice Cream 



Compliments of 

J. R. MANSFIELD & SON 

FUNERAL HOME 
South Main Street Haydenville 



Compliments of 

BEAVER BROOK POULTRY 
FARM 

LEEDS, MASS. 



Compliments of 



MORIN'S BARBER SHOP 



Haydenville, Mass. 



j. f. McAllister 

ESSO SERVICENTER 

Gasolines — Motor Oil — Tires 

Route 9 Haydenville 

Batteries — Accessories 



BEEBE'S LUNCH 

A GOOD PLACE TO EAT 
Ice Cream and Beverages 

Berkshire Trail Haydenville 

A. T. BEEBE, Prop. 



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Headquarters for Everything Electric 

SALES AND SERVICE 

Nothing Too Small or Too Large 

All Work Done by Experts 

We Repair All Radios and Electrical Appliances 

Parson's Electric Shop 

28 Center Street Northampton, Mass. 

Electrical Contracting Since 1900 



Phone 1307 



CHILSON'S SHOP 

W. LEROY CHILSON 

Furniture Coverings and Upholstery Supplies 

Awnings — Venetian Blinds — Rusco Windows 

Furniture Upholstering — Window Shades 

Automobile Plate & Safety Glass — Truck Covers <S Canvas Goods 

Slip Covers, Cushions Auto Tops and Upholstery 

34 Center Street Northampton 



CERRUTI'S 

JEWELERS — ENGRAVERS 

WATCHMAKERS 

Northampton 



Compliments of 



COHEN BROS. 



Easthampton 



Northampton 






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Compliments of 



The Snack Bar 



Main Street 



WILLIAMSBURG 



White House Hamburgs 



At Foot of Main's Hill, Leeds, Mass. 



'When better Hamburgs are made, we'll make 'em." 



PAT HURTEAU, Prop. 



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A. SOLTYS 

MEATS — GROCERIES — VEGETABLES 
Telephone 223 
HAYDENVILLE 



Compliments of 



CHUCK'S RADIO SHOP 



HAYDENVILLE, MASS. 



New England 
Printing Co., Inc. 



PHONE 



Cl-UITY URVICt 



'Producers 
of 



idusiinctim: 



609 



S Rear 20 Arnold Street 



Westfield, Massachusetts